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CYNTHIA ANN PARKER

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For more information or to make reservations:
Phone: (830) 643-0656
E-mail: vacation@nbleasing.com
Online: Contact Form







This unit is located in the heart of downtown New Braunfels right on the Town Square. Just minutes from famous Schlitterbahn and walking distance to Comal and Guadalupe Rivers. The bedroom has a king size bed with a top quality plush mattress and high end linens. The living room offers one full size sleeper sofa, flat screen television, cable, patio doors that lead to a balcony that overlooks the downtown square. Kitchen is fully equipped with cookware, bake ware, utensils, stove, refridgerator and microwave. Laundry facility on-site. Wi-Fi is available.

Sleeps 4
1 Bedroom
1 Bathroom
King size bed
Full size sleeper sofa

2 Night Min.
3 Night Min. on Holidays







HISTORY
Cynthia Ann ("Nadua") Parker

ca 1825-ca 1871
Mother of the Last and Greatest Comanche Chief Quanah Parker


On May 19, 1836 when Cynthia, of Scots-Irish descent, was approximately 11 years old and living with her family, several hundred Caddo, Comanche and Kiowa attacked Fort Parker killing several inhabitants. The Comanche seized 5 captives, including Cynthia Ann and her brother, John. Although all captives were later returned to their families, she became Comanche and remained with them for almost 25 years.

Around 1848, Indian agent Robert S. Neighbors learned that she was among the Tenawa Comanche. She refused all attempts to rescue her. She married Peta Nocoma, the young chief who gained fame for his many violent raids. Comanche warriors usually took take several wives, Peta never took any wife except Cynthia. They had 3 children, Quanah, Pecos and Topsannah ("Prairie Flower").

On December 18, 1860 when Cynthia was approximately 34 years old and having been a Comanche for 24 years, Texas Rangers attacked Peta's hunting camp and captured Peta, Quanah and Pecos. Peta was killed, but Quanah and Pecos managed to escape. The Rangers were surprised to find that one of the Commanche had blue eyes; a non English speaking white woman with her infant daughter. While traveling through Fort Worth she was photographed with her daughter at her breast and her hair cut short - a Comanche sign of mourning.

Cynthia tried many times to escape back to her Comanche family, but was brought back each time. Her young daughter, Prairie Flower, died at the age of 3. She was not able to adapt to life living with her American family and was always grieving over the unknown fate of her two sons. She died in 1870, only 10 years after being recaptured and returned to her white family.

Her son Quanah, who became a wealthy rancher and influential in Comanche and European American society, was the last and most famous Comanche Chief. He finally found his mother, but only after she had died. He had her body moved in 1910 to Cache, Oklahoma and he was buried next to her in 1911. Both were moved to Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1957.

There are still yearly memorials, books, plays, operas, movies and studies honoring the lives of this extraordinary mother and son.